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As Abortion Decision Looms, Supreme Court Faces ‘Historic Backlog’ Not Seen In Over 70 Years

Following one of the most controversial developments in the history of the Supreme Court indicating it could overturn Roe v. Wade, justices have their work cut out for them in the final month of the Court’s term.  The Supreme Court must still decide on 33 cases before the end of June; that makes up 53% of …

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Following one of the most controversial developments in the history of the Supreme Court indicating it could overturn Roe v. Wade, justices have their work cut out for them in the final month of the Court’s term. 

The Supreme Court must still decide on 33 cases before the end of June; that makes up 53% of the 62 total argued cases for the 2021-2022 term, the largest percentage of cases to be decided for a term in the last month since 1950, according to a report from Bloomberg. 

“The historic backlog — the biggest in percentage terms since at least 1950, according to empiricalscotus.com founder Adam Feldman — comes as the justices and their law clerks deal with an investigation into the leak of a draft opinion overturning the Roe v. Wade abortion-rights ruling,” Bloomberg reported. 

Feldman noted that along with the highly-anticipated abortion decision, the Court is also due to issue opinions on other significant cases. Pending rulings include a Second Amendment case stemming from New York, a case on religion in schools, and a decision on the Biden administration’s attempt to end the Trump-era “Remain in Mexico” policy. 

June has always been a “hectic” and “contentious” time for the Supreme Court, former Solicitor General Greg Garre told Bloomberg. However, this month will be historically controversial as the American people wait on the Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization ruling, which could result in abortion being severely restricted or banned in more than two dozen states

“June is invariably a hectic and contentious time at the Court,” Garre said. “And in that sense, this June will be no different. But the storm clouds obviously look more severe in terms of what could lie ahead.”

Conservatives are optimistic about the significant decisions coming out this month, thanks to former President Donald Trump’s three appointed justices, who, along with three previously Republican-appointed justices, give the Court an originalist edge. 

The conservative-leaning Court’s stance on abortion was revealed in early May when a leaked draft of the majority opinion, authored by Justice Samuel Alito, was published by Politico. The unprecedented leak sent shockwaves throughout the country as pro-abortion rights advocates bemoaned the draft opinion, and pro-life supporters cheered that nearly 50 years of abortion protection could soon end. 

“After almost 50 years, we really could see a major sea change in the country,” National Right to Life Committee President Carol Tobias said. 

The date for the final ruling on Dobbs v. Jackson remains unknown, but the 33 remaining opinions have to be issued before June 27, when the Court’s term officially ends. 

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Gov. Newsom Signs Off On Reversing Loitering Law Police Used To Crack Down On Human Trafficking And Prostitution

California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a bill on Friday that reversed the loitering law police used to crack down on human trafficking and prostitution in the Golden State. Authored by San Francisco’s Democrat Sen. Scott Wiener, SB 357 repeals a law that criminalized “loitering with the intent to engage in prostitution.” He says the law …

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California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a bill on Friday that reversed the loitering law police used to crack down on human trafficking and prostitution in the Golden State.

Authored by San Francisco’s Democrat Sen. Scott Wiener, SB 357 repeals a law that criminalized “loitering with the intent to engage in prostitution.” He says the law gave law enforcement a subjective perception of whether a person is “acting like” or “looks like” they engage in prostitution—especially transgender, black, and brown women. However, Weiner says revoking the law would not decriminalize soliciting or engaging in prostitution.

But opposers of the bill — on and off the Senate floor — all conclude taking away authority to investigate such loitering cases creates an easier environment for traffickers, pimps, and prostitution.

Former Los Angeles Police Department vice sergeant Stephany Powell, who has since become the director of law enforcement training and survivor services at the National Center on Sexual Exploitation, said the bill would severely limit law enforcement’s ability to identify victims of human trafficking — including minors.

“Many officers rely on the loitering laws to initiate trafficking investigations that have led to serious convictions for traffickers and pimps,” Powell said in a statement. “SB 357 assumes that loitering laws are used to merely harass marginalized people, and by repealing them, these people will experience less discrimination from police. In reality, repealing loitering laws will only cause further harm to communities with existing poverty and high crime.”

CBS reported The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department and the 75,000-member Peace Officers Research Association of California also objected to the bill as it would make confronting those who commit prostitution-related crimes more difficult and Powell said in a tweet on Saturday that the “California bear has a tear in his eye” the day after Newsom signed the legislation.

“The Black community will be a free place for sex buyers (solicitation) and traffickers (procurement) to loiter and roam,” she said.

Victims of human trafficking and advocates to end modern-day slavery who opposed the bill spoke out against it at a press conference just before it passed through the Assembly and Senate last year.

Vanessa Russel, founder of Love Never Fails, a San Francisco-based anti-sex trafficking organization, said instead of providing help to survivors, the bill hurts them and causes the demand to increase.

Survivor Hannah Diaz, who joined Russel last year at an event opposing the bill, said “fatalities will increase” without the intervention allowed by law enforcement.

“With trauma-informed training and identification tactics, Diaz said. “Officers are an invaluable asset to the war against human trafficking.”

Assemblyman Jim Patterson (R-Fresno) said law enforcement works with anti-trafficking non-profits to rescue sex-trafficked minors and women.

“When we separate the victim on the street with the pimp down the block and around the corner,” Patterson said according to California Family Council. “They are not going to jail; they are going to a safe house. They are going to a place that cares for them.”

Assemblywoman Cottie Petrie-Norris (D-Irvine) said the bill further endangers women and girls.

“We often vote on very well-intentioned legislation that has unintended consequences,” Petrie-Norris said. “For me, the unintended consequence is making it more difficult to protect victims of child trafficking, even if that is a possibility.”

Yet Weiner’s supporters of the bill — like ACLUE California Action and Equality California and Democrats lawmakers — believe reversing the legislation takes away law enforcement authority to harass minority women, the transgender community, or individuals who look or dress like prostitutes.

Gov. Newsom stated during his signing of the bill, The Sacramento Bee reported, that his administration would monitor crime and prosecution trends for any possible unintended consequences and would act to mitigate such impacts.

“To be clear, this bill does not legalize prostitution. It simply revokes provisions of the law that have led to disproportionate harassment of women and transgendered adults,” he said. “While I agree with the author’s intent and I am signing this legislation, we must be cautious about its implementation.”

California has implemented several loitering laws in recent years. In 2016, the state passed a law that would treat minors involved in prostitution as victims instead of criminals. In addition, a 2019 bill bans arresting prostitutes who report various crimes as victims or witnesses.

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Mississippi Governor Says Doctors In His State Will Lose Their Medical License For Prescribing Abortion Pills

Mississippi Republican Governor Tate Reeves said on Sunday that doctors in his state will lose their medical license for prescribing abortion pills. Reeves shared the comments during an interview on “Fox News Sunday” following the Supreme Court’s ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade and return abortion laws to states. “If a physician is practicing medicine in the …

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Mississippi Republican Governor Tate Reeves said on Sunday that doctors in his state will lose their medical license for prescribing abortion pills.

Reeves shared the comments during an interview on “Fox News Sunday” following the Supreme Court’s ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade and return abortion laws to states.

“If a physician is practicing medicine in the state of Mississippi, they have to have a license to do so and if abortion is illegal in our state, which it is, then those medicines will not be allowed and they will not have a license to practice in our state,” Reeves said.

“Any physician that is practicing, whether it’s through telemedicine or otherwise… that practices in our state is practicing not only based upon the standards of care that we require in our state, but also based upon state law,” he added.

The governor also argued that his state’s board of medical licensure will take away the license of those who violate the ban against abortion pills.

“And so if a physician is attempting to practice medicine in the state of Mississippi and they are violating our law, then our state board of medical licensure will pull the license from them,” he stated.

Reeves was also asked about a potential state bill that would allow abortion after a case of rape.

“I don’t believe that an exception for rape will make it through the Mississippi legislature and make it to my desk,” he responded.

Mississippi is not the only state making new laws regarding abortion pills. Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards (D-LA) signed a bill into law last month that will make mailing abortion pills a crime in his state.

SB 388 will “prohibit criminal abortion by means of the use of an abortion inducing drug without the prescribing physician being physically present during the administration of the drug,” including a $1,000 fine and a maximum of six months in prison.

The bill, which goes into effect on August 1, does not allow a pregnant woman to be punished under the new policy. Other contraceptive methods, such as Plan B, are also not banned by the law.

South Dakota Republican Governor Kristi Noem signed a bill to ban telemedicine abortion in March.

HB 1318 will “prohibit medical abortion by telemedicine and … increase the penalty for the unlicensed practice of medicine when performing a medical abortion.” The legislation will require mifepristone and misoprostol to be dispensed from licensed physicians and prohibit obtaining the drugs online or by mail for the purposes of a chemical abortion.

“With this bill, we will protect both unborn babies and their mothers from this dangerous procedure,” Noem wrote ahead of signing it into law.

The Guttmacher Institute reported that medication abortion accounted for 54% of US abortions by 2020.

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WATCH: Ilhan Omar Booed At Somali Concert In Minnesota: ‘Get The F*** Out Of Here!’

Far-left Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) was booed at a concert in Minneapolis over the weekend in front of a predominantly Somali crowd, with some in the audience telling her to “go home” and “get the f*** out of here.” The Suldaan Seeraar concert was held at the Target Center late on Saturday night. It was …

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Far-left Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) was booed at a concert in Minneapolis over the weekend in front of a predominantly Somali crowd, with some in the audience telling her to “go home” and “get the f*** out of here.”

The Suldaan Seeraar concert was held at the Target Center late on Saturday night. It was the musician’s first time performing in North America.

As Omar was introduced on stage with her husband, the crowd began to boo loudly.

Some other performers on stage told the audience, “don’t do this,” as they continued to boo Omar.

“Okay, okay, okay, okay, okay, we don’t have all night,” Omar said as the crowd kept booing.

WATCH:

The concert appeared to be part of Somali Week in Minnesota’s Somali community, which can draw crowds of tens of thousands of people.

Omar was recently in the news after she claimed that religious freedom in America was “dead” after the Supreme Court ruled in favor of a high school football coach who was told he wasn’t allowed to pray on the field in front of players.

“The Supreme Court just ruled that public school teachers can pressure students to join in prayer at public school events but can also retaliate against those that don’t join in,” Omar tweeted. “Religious freedom is dead in America.”

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) responded: “Every word of this is false.”

Earlier this year, Omar introduced a resolution that would subject U.S. citizens to being prosecuted by an international court, and she did so all in the name of holding Russian President Vladimir Putin “accountable” for the actions of the Russian military in Ukraine.

“In the wake of reports of war crimes committed by Russian forces in Ukraine, Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) introduced a resolution calling on the United States to become a full member of the International Criminal Court,” Omar’s office said in a statement. “The United States is one of a few countries that has not joined the International Criminal Court (ICC), which investigates war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocides.”

By joining the ICC, the U.S. would be subjecting itself and its citizens to the ICC’s jurisdiction. Omar effectively admits this in an op-ed, writing: “If we oppose investigations into countries, like our own, that haven’t joined the ICC, how can we support an investigation into Russia, another country that hasn’t joined the court?”

The Congressional Research Service noted that the U.S. “maintains that any investigation” by the ICC “is illegal because the United States is not a party to the Rome Statute and has not consented to the ICC’s jurisdiction.”

RELATED: Ilhan Omar Slammed Over Tweet About Christians Singing On Plane: ‘Shut Up And Stop Being A Bigot’

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